Mount Freaking Hood

By Alexander Gilbert,

What is the force that gravitates us to a mountain? Why, I’ll place my bet that a prominent landmark is interpreted as prominence, and we love prominence! Like humans to prestige.

Hood’s eminence spreads in many directions. With a grandeur of size that’ll inform you of a visiting Texan when you overhear “it’s bigger’n Dallas!” (At least give them credit if they spot and name the right mountain.) The enormity as well equates longevity. An everlasting life; that we marvel at. Though neighboring Helens is a testament to the mortality of even mountains.

People want a piece of Hood’s prominence. Maybe a home with a view of the mountain, a business with a Hood trademark, or better yet a glorying climb to the top. We want to be buddies with Hood. Although the simple act of gazing at the mountain from a park bench is enough for ol’ Wy’East.

Furthermore a summer hike is treading on that marvelous view, or becoming the view—in our small way. The beauty that surrounds, and is the mountain should be seen close up. Upon inspection you may find an environment that surly every other composer had in mind when creating their jams.

The 1000 miles of trails is a winding haven of camaraderie. Take a rest at a trail junction, and banter on with fellow hikers that are—maybe a head-nod stranger, anywhere else. It takes over a million acres of National Forest, 11,250 foot mountain, and some exercise to get us acting sociable again. Unless your one of the few that grew up in a large metropolitan, and succumb to a panicky nature overload. Cougar!

Timberline Trail circumnavigates Hood for the daring 3-5 day backpacking explorer, and the casual day-hiker, but you could always cling on to civilization at the the Timberline Lodge if need be. And safely peer out the window with a burger in your hand. The lodge is a great point of reference, place to park the car, location to set your car GPS to, and a hang-out spot right around tree line.

On the other hand if your aiming to have a real mountaineering ramble up Hood then find yourself on Barrett Spur. An unstable primitive trail that flings up a ridge between Coe and Ladd glaciers to a viewpoint at roughly 7300 feet. Find this off of the Dollar Lake Trail from the Timberline Trail. Then prepare for a bout of rocks that may require hands as well as feet. With trepidatious winds furling your brow. In the midst of rugged alpine life including a scampering marmot reminding you how life survives in extreme conditions. At the end of the Barrett Spur trail settle in for a view that may take hours to comprehend.

Perchance Hood will always remain uncharted, an unknown—in our eyes. A beacon of life and of other spiritual aspects that tend to escape comprehension. Many recreational activities are available, however hiking, has a slow and personal pace where the true value and identity of the mountain may tinge our digital aged minds. So go take a hike on Wy’East. 20150620_142825

What is the force that gravitates us to a mountain? Why, I’ll place my bet that a prominent landmark is interpreted as prominence, and we love prominence! Like humans to prestige.

Hood’s eminence spreads in many directions. With a grandeur of size that’ll inform you of a visiting Texan when you overhear “it’s bigger’n Dallas!” (At least give them credit if they spot and name the right mountain.) The enormity as well equates longevity. An everlasting life; that we marvel at. Though neighboring Helens is a testament to the mortality of even mountains.

People want a piece of Hood’s prominence. Maybe a home with a view of the mountain, a business with a Hood trademark, or better yet a glorying climb to the top. We want to be buddies with Hood. Although the simple act of gazing at the mountain from a park bench is enough for ol’ Wy’East.

Furthermore a summer hike is treading on that marvelous view, or becoming the view—in our small way. The beauty that surrounds, and is the mountain should be seen close up. Upon inspection you may find an environment that surly every other composer had in mind when creating their jams.

The 1000 miles of trails is a winding haven of camaraderie. Take a rest at a trail junction, and banter on with fellow hikers that are—maybe a head-nod stranger, anywhere else. It takes over a million acres of National Forest, 11,250 foot mountain, and some exercise to get us acting sociable again. Unless your one of the few that grew up in a large metropolitan, and succumb to a panicky nature overload. Cougar!

Timberline Trail circumnavigates Hood for the daring 3-5 day backpacking explorer, and the casual day-hiker, but you could always cling on to civilization at the the Timberline Lodge if need be. And safely peer out the window with a burger in your hand. The lodge is a great point of reference, place to park the car, location to set your car GPS to, and a hang-out spot right around tree line.

On the other hand if your aiming to have a real mountaineering ramble up Hood then find yourself on Barrett Spur. An unstable primitive trail that flings up a ridge between Coe and Ladd glaciers to a viewpoint at roughly 7300 feet. Find this off of the Dollar Lake Trail from the Timberline Trail. Then prepare for a bout of rocks that may require hands as well as feet. With trepidatious winds furling your brow. In the midst of rugged alpine life including a scampering marmot reminding you how life survives in extreme conditions. At the end of the Barrett Spur trail settle in for a view that may take hours to comprehend.

Perchance Hood will always remain uncharted, an unknown—in our eyes. A beacon of life and of other spiritual aspects that tend to escape comprehension. Many recreational activities are available, however hiking, has a slow and personal pace where the true value and identity of the mountain may tinge our digital aged minds. So go take a hike on Wy’East.

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